Excellence and Enjoyment

The Principles of Learning and Teaching

Good learning and teaching:

  • ensures that every child succeeds. At Woodside School we provide an inclusive education within a culture of high expectations
  • builds on what learners already know. We structure and pace our teaching so that our children know what is to be learnt, how and why.
  • makes learning vivid and real. We strive to develop understanding through enquiry, creativity, e-learning and problem solving.
  • makes learning an enjoyable and challenging experience. We aim to stimulate learning through matching teaching techniques and strategies to a range of learning styles.
  • enriches the learning experience. We build on learning skills across the curriculum.
  • promotes assessment for learning. Our children are partners in their learning.

The Five Outcomes

The five outcomes that are most important to children and young people are:

  • Being healthy
  • Staying safe
  • Enjoying and achieving
  • Making a positive contribution
  • Achieving economic well-being

These five outcomes are universal ambitions for every child whatever their background or circumstances. Improving outcomes for all children underpins all of our work.

Children learn and thrive when they are healthy, safe and engaged and educational achievement is the most effective route to meaningful employment and economic independence and well-being later in life.

Our school aims that each child shall learn….

1. to read fluently, with understanding, feeling, discrimination and enjoyment

2. to write creatively and effectively with a good standard of spelling, grammar and punctuation

3. to communicate clearly and confidently in through both speech and writing, in ways appropriate for a range occasions and purposes

4. to listen attentively with understanding

5. to acquire information from various sources, and to record/use/manipulate it in various ways

6. to apply computational skills with speed and accuracy

7. to understand mathematical language and concepts in order:

  • to extend understanding through a process of enquiry and experiment,
  • to successfully manipulate them and apply them in various situations in home, school and beyond
  • to appreciate the structure of mathematics and the nature of number
  • to be aware of the applications of mathematics in the world
  • to develop analytical and logical ways of thinking

8. to be able to observe, recognise, discriminate and classify characteristics such as pattern and order

9. to have a good understanding of age appropriate scientific ideas and methodologies

10. to:

  • investigate and interpret evidence
  • analyse and solve problems
  • understand the importance of controlling variables
  • present data in a variety of ways

11. to:

  • develop an awareness of self and a sensitivity and empathy towards others
  • acquire moral values and the confidence to make and hold valid moral judgements distinguishing fact from opinion
  • be aware of gender and racist/multi-cultural issues, recognising prejudice, bias and superstition
  • develop habits of self discipline and acceptable behaviour

12. to know about:

  • geographical, historical and social aspects of our immediate and wider community and our national heritage and culture
  • other times, places, cultures, religions and races and to recognise links between local, national and international events and their importance for him/her as a member of society

13. to be able to use various art forms and craft and design skills as means of expression using a variety of materials and methods demanding a range of manipulative and technological skills and to extend their skills in these areas and to be aware of art and design in the environment both past and present

14. to be able to use new technology effectively in a rapidly changing society

15. to develop

  • agility and physical co-ordination and confidence in and through appropriate physical activity
  • the ability to express feeling through movement, drama and dance
  • the ability to swim
  • an understanding of the body, its workings and the importance of physical activity
  • an understanding and awareness of the importance of a healthy, well balanced diet
  • an understanding of the effect on health of solvent , tobacco, alcohol and drug abuse

16. to appreciate music through listening/appreciation, performing and composing

17. to understand the impact of human activity on the environment

18. to understand the value of achieving happiness for self and others and that both may be achieved by contributing positively to society

Our Aims in Teaching PSHE and Citizenship

  • Personal, Social and Health Education and Citizenship helps to give our children the knowledge, skills and understanding they need to lead confident, healthy, independent lives and to become informed, active, responsible citizens.
  • Our children are encouraged to take part in a wide range of activities and experiences across and beyond the curriculum, contributing fully to the life of their school and communities. In doing so, they learn to recognise their own worth, work well with others and become increasingly responsible for their own learning.
  • Our children are provided with the opportunities to reflect on their experiences and understand how they are developing personally and socially, tackling many of the spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues that are part of growing up.
  • To provide children with the opportunities and experiences to find out about the main political and social institutions that affect their lives and about their responsibilities, rights and duties as individual and members of communities.
  • To learn to understand and respect our common humanity, diversity and differences so that they can go on to form the effective, fulfilling relationships that are an essential part of life and learning.
  • To link our school with our neighbours and community partners.
  • To support inclusion and promote positive behaviour, equal opportunities, respect and responsibility.
  • To empower our children to respect themselves as individuals, whilst developing an understanding, tolerance and respect for others and their differences, treating all people as equal
  • To empower our children to develop a clear set of values and attitudes, including honesty and kindness, and to establish a strong moral code
  • To enable our children to value themselves as unique human beings, capable of spiritual, moral, intellectual and physical growth and development
  • To enable all children to develop communication and social skills
  • To enable our children to develop their varied abilities and talents fully, setting achievable goals, learning to work and try hard, and understanding both success and failure
  • To learn to live and enjoy a healthy lifestyle
  • Develop an active role as a member of a family and of the community
  • To encourage our children to value family as a firm basis for the nurturing of children
  • To enable our children to understand the principles of our society and democracy
  • Value their role as a contributing member of a democratic society
  • To encourage our children to take pride in our country, in our nation’s institutions, its traditions, heritage and history.
  • To encourage our children to respect the rule of law and encourage others to do so
  • To encourage our children to respect religious and cultural diversity and develop an understanding of the beliefs and practices of major world religions
  • To encourage our children to respect the beauty and diversity of the environment and accept responsibility for its maintenance for future generations

Effective PSHE and Citizenship

There are four strands in effective PSHE+C teaching and learning:

  • Developing confidence and responsibility and making the most of children’s abilities
  • Preparing to play an active role as citizens
  • Developing a healthy, safer lifestyle
  • Developing good relationships and respecting the differences between people

Children are entitled to learn and practice key like skills which include:

Emotional skills

  • Managing emotions confidently
  • Developing empathy for others
  • Independent thought and behaviour

Social skills

  • Developing and maintaining relationships
  • Taking responsibility for their own and others’ emotional, physical and sexual health

Communication skills

  • Participating
  • Listening
  • Asking questions
  • Expressing emotions and opinions
  • Resisting peer pressure
  • Managing and resolving conflict

Negotiation skills

Practical skills

  • Caring for self and others
  • Accessing support and advice

Decision making skills

  • Managing dilemmas
  • Assessing risk
  • Making informed choices and being able to act upon them

PSHE and Citizenship in the Foundation Stage of Learning

We endeavour to give all of our children a well-planned and well-organised environment which gives them rich, stimulating experiences.

The Foundation Stage of learning begins when the child is three and extends until the end of FS3. The Foundation Stage curriculum is organised into six areas of learning:

  • Personal, social and emotional development
  • Language and literacy
  • Mathematical development
  • Knowledge and understanding of the world
  • Physical development
  • Creative development

As with the KS1 and KS2 curriculum there are strong cross-curricular links in relation to the teaching and learning of PSHE and Citizenship e.g. through role play, music, dance, design and technology, reading, writing, speaking and listening etc but the key Early Learning Goals for PSHE and Citizenship are included within Personal, Social and Emotional Development.

To give all of our children the best opportunity for effective Personal, Social and Emotional development we plan to help all of our children to:

  • develop positive dispositions and attitudes
  • develop confidence and independence
  • form positive relationships
  • understand right and wrong and the need for rules
  • understand and respect the needs, views, cultures and beliefs of others
  • express feelings
  • be aware of their own needs and the needs of others
  • develop an awareness of their own needs with regard to diet, sleeping and hygiene
  • recognise the importance of a healthy lifestyle

The “Prior Learning” elements of the QCA PSHE and Citizenship Study Units informs our planning and teaching of PSHE AND CITIZENSHIP in the Early Years.

PSHE and Citizenship in KS1

During KS1, children learn about themselves as developing individuals and as members of their communities, building on their own experiences and on the early learning goals for personal, social and emotional development. They learn the basic rules and skills for keeping themselves healthy and safe and for behaving well. They have opportunities to show they can take responsibility for themselves and their environment. They begin to learn about their own and other people’s feelings and become aware of the views, needs and rights of other children and old people. As members of a class and school community, they learn social skills such as how to share, take turns, play, help others, resolve simple arguments and resist bullying. They begin to take an active part in the life of their school and it’s neighbourhood.

Knowledge, skills and understanding in PSHE

and Citizenship in KS1

Developing confidence and responsibility and making the most of their abilities

Children are taught:

  • To recognise what they like and dislike, what is fair and unfair, and what is right and wrong.
  • To share their opinions on things that matter to them and explain their views.
  • To recognise, name and deal with their feelings in a positive way.
  • To think about themselves, learn from their experiences and recognise what they are good at.
  • How to set simple goals.

Preparing to play an active role as citizens

Children are taught:

  • To take part in discussions with one other person, in groups and the whole class.
  • To take part in simple debates about topical issues.
  • To recognise choices they can make, and recognise the difference between right and wrong.
  • To agree and follow rules for their group and classroom and understand how rules help them.
  • To realise that people and other living things have needs, and that they have responsibilities to meet them.
  • That they belong to various groups and communities, such as family and school.
  • What improves and harms their local, natural and built environments and about some of the ways people look after them.
  • To contribute towards the life of the class and school.
  • To realise that money comes from different sources and can be used for different purposes.

Developing a healthier, safer lifestyle

Children are taught:

  • How to make simple choices that improve their health and well-being.
  • To maintain personal hygiene.
  • How some diseases spread and can be controlled.
  • About the process of growing from young to old and how people’s needs change.
  • The names of the main parts of the body.
  • That all household products, including medicines, can be harmful if not used properly.
  • Rules for, and ways of, keeping safe, including basic road safety, and about people who can help them to stay safe.

Developing good relationships and respecting the differences between people

Children are taught:

  • To recognise how their behaviour affects other people.
  • To listen to other people and play and work co-operatively.
  • To identify and respect the differences and similarities between people.
  • That family and friends should care for each other.
  • That there are different types of teasing and bullying, that bullying is wrong, and how to get help in dealing deal with bullying.

Breadth of Study in PSHE and Citizenship in KS1

During KS1, children are taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through opportunities to:

  • Take and share responsibility (e.g. for their own behaviour; by helping to make classroom rules and following them; by looking after pets well.)
  • Feel positive about themselves (e.g. by having their achievements recognised and by being given positive feedback about themselves.)
  • Take part in discussions (e.g. talking about topics of school, local, national, European, Commonwealth and global concern, such as ‘where our food and raw materials for industry come from.’)
  • Make real choices (e.g. between health options in school meals, what to watch on television, what games to play, how to spend and save money sensibly.)
  • Meet and talk with people (e.g. with outside visitors such as religious leaders, police officers, the school nurse etc.)
  • Develop relationships through work and play (e.g. by sharing equipment with other children or their friends in a group task.)
  • Consider social and moral dilemmas that they come across in everyday life (e.g. aggressive behaviour, questions about fairness, right and wrong, simple political issues, use of money, simple environmental issues.)
  • Ask for help (e.g. from family and friends, midday supervisors, older children, the police.)

PSHE and Citizenship in KS2

During KS 2 children learn about themselves as growing and changing individuals with their own experiences and ideas, and as members of their communities. They become more mature, independent and self-confident. They learn about the wider world and the interdependence of communities within it. They develop their sense of social justice and moral responsibility and begin to understand that their own choices and behaviour can affect local, national or global issues and political and social institutions. They learn how to take part more fully in school and community activities. As they begin to develop into young adults, they face the changes of puberty and transfer to secondary school with support and encouragement from our school. They learn how to make more confident and informed choices about their health and environment; to take more responsibility, individually and as a group, for their own learning; and to resist bullying.

Knowledge, skills and understanding in PSHE and Citizenship in KS2

Developing confidence and responsibility and making the most of their abilities

Our children are taught:

  • To talk and write about their opinions, and explain their views, on issues that affect themselves and society.
  • To recognise their worth as individuals by identifying positive things about themselves and their achievements, seeing their mistakes, making amends and setting personal goals.
  • To face new challenges positively by collecting information, looking for help, making responsible choices and taking action.
  • To recognise, as they approach puberty, how people’s emotions change at that time and how to deal with their feelings towards themselves, their family and others in a positive way.
  • About the range of jobs carried out by people they know, and to understand how they can develop skills to make their own contribution in the future.
  • To look after their money and realise that future wants and needs may be met through saving.

Preparing to play an active role as citizens

Our children are taught:

  • To research, discuss and debate topical issues, problems and events.
  • Why and how rules and laws are made and enforced, why different rules are needed in different situations and how to take part in making and changing rules.
  • To realise the consequences of anti-social and aggressive behaviours, such as bullying and racism, on individuals and communities.
  • That there are different kinds of responsibilities, rights and duties at home, at school and in the community, and that these can sometimes conflict with each other.
  • To reflect on spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues, using imagination to understand other people’s experiences.
  • To resolve differences by looking at alternatives, making decisions and explaining choices.
  • What democracy is, and about the basic institutions that support it locally and nationally.
  • To recognise the role of voluntary, community and pressure groups.
  • To appreciate the range of national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom.
  • That resources can be allocated in different ways and that these economic choices affect individuals, communities and the sustainability of the environment.
  • To explore how the media present information.

Developing a healthy, safer lifestyle

Our children are taught:

  • What makes a healthy lifestyle, including the benefits of exercise and healthy eating, what affects mental health, and how to make informed choices.
  • That bacteria and viruses can affect health and that following simple, safe routines can reduce their spread.
  • About how the body changes as they approach puberty.
  • Which commonly available substances and drugs are legal and illegal, their effects and risks.
  • To recognise the different risks in different situations and then decide how to behave responsibly, including sensible road use, and judging what kind of physical contact is acceptable or unacceptable.
  • That pressure to behave in an acceptable or risky way can come from a variety of sources, including people they know, and how to ask for help and use basic techniques for resisting pressures to do wrong.
  • School rules about health and safety, basic emergency aid procedures and where to get help.

Developing good relationships and respecting the differences between people

Our children are taught:

  • That their actions affect themselves and others, to care about other people’s feelings and to try to see things form their points of view.
  • To think about the lives of people living in other places and times, and people with different values and customs.
  • To be aware of different types of relationship, including marriage and those between friends and families, and to develop the skills to be effective in relationships.
  • To realise the nature and consequences of racism, teasing, bullying and aggressive behaviours, and how to respond to them and ask for help.
  • To recognise and challenge stereotypes.
  • That differences and similarities between people arise from a number of factors, including cultural, ethnic, racial and religious diversity, gender and disability.
  • Where individuals, families and groups can get help and support.

Breadth of Study in PSHE and Citizenship in KS2

During KS2, children are taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through opportunities to:

  • Take responsibility (e.g. for planning and looking after the school environment; for the needs of others, such as by acting as a peer supporter, as a befriender, or as a playground mediator for younger children; for looking after animals properly; for identifying safe, healthy and sustainable means of travel when planning their journey to school)
  • Feel positive about themselves (e.g. by producing personal diaries, profiles and portfolios of achievements; by having opportunities to show what they can do and how much responsibility they can take)
  • Participate (e.g. in the school’s decision-making process, relating it to democratic structures and processes such as councils, parliaments, government and voting)
  • Make real choices and decisions (e.g. about issues affecting their health and well-being such as smoking; on the use of scarce resources; how to spend money, including pocket money and contributions to charities)
  • Meet and talk with people (e.g. people who contribute to society through environmental pressure groups or international aid organisation; people who work in the school and the neighbourhood, such as religious leaders, community policy officers)
  • Develop relationships through work and play (e.g. taking part in activities with groups that have particular needs, such as children with special needs and the elderly; communicating with children in other countries by satellite, e-mail or letters)
  • Consider social and moral dilemmas that they come across in life (e.g. encouraging respect and understanding between different races and dealing with harassment)
  • Find information and advice (e.g. through helplines; by understanding about welfare systems in society)
  • Prepare for change (e.g. transferring to secondary school)

Our Scheme of Work for PSHE and Citizenship

As our children are organised in mixed age classes, the Units are taught like this:

KS1

Key units for Year 1 and Year 2 are taught on a two-year cycle so that all children study the same units, but some may do so in Year 1 and some in Year 2.

Year 3/4

Key units for Year 3 and Year 4 are taught on a two-year cycle so that all children study the units by some may do so in Year 3 and some in Year 4.

Year 5/6

The Units for Year 5 and Year 6 are taught on a two-year cycle so that all children study the units, but some may do so in Year 5 and some in Year 6.

*See APPENDIX THREE for this Key Stage/Year Group Study Unit Cycle

Planning for quality, continuity and progression in

PSHE and Citizenship

All planning is undertaken within each Year Group and is monitored and moderated by Senior Managers and our PSHE and Citizenship Leader.

Long Term Planning

The overall SOW and the Key Stage/Year Group Plans form our long-term plan for PSHE and Citizenship. The Study Units are distributed across the Key Stages in a sequence that promotes continuity and progression in teaching and learning. Links with other subjects are highlighted.

Medium Term Planning

Our Medium Term Planning identifies:

  • starting points
  • learning objectives
  • key questions
  • key skills
  • key activities

The planning is informed by the Telling Tales framework. Links with other subjects are planned in.

Short Term Planning

Our Short Term Planning details the activity/lesson.

Monitoring Standards in PSHE and Citizenship

Our PSHE and Citizenship Leader monitors standards throughout our school by:

  • Scrutinising long, medium and short term planning
  • Scrutinising samples of children’s work
  • Talking with children
  • Talking with colleagues

When able to observe teaching, the following areas are monitored:

  • The teacher’s security of subject skills, knowledge and understanding
  • The teacher’s enthusiasm for PSHE and Citizenship
  • The appropriate use of resources
  • The children’s ability to use prior skills, knowledge and understanding
  • The structure of the lesson
  • The pace of the lesson
  • The teacher’s use of questioning
  • Planning c/f practice
  • Classroom organisation
  • Use of support staff

The role our PSHE+C Manager

  • To be a member of our Foundation Curriculum Team.
  • To work in partnership with our Foundation Team Leaders who will coordinate and manage the quality of teaching and learning and standards in PSHE+C and its application across the school
  • To have a thorough knowledge and understanding of PSHE+C in the Foundation Stage Curriculum and across KS1 and KS2.
  • To overview the teaching and learning of PSHE+C throughout the school working in partnership with our Foundation Team Managers.
  • To monitor and ensure continuity and progression in the teaching and learning of PSHE+C throughout the school working in partnership with our Foundation Team Managers.
  • To contribute towards the monitoring, review and development of policy and practice with a particular focus upon PSHE+C.
  • To constantly strive to raise standards in PSHE+C throughout the school working in partnership with our Foundation Team Managers.
  • To ensure that the use of PSHE+C resource areas is monitored
  • To ensure that our Foundation Team Mangers are aware of any resourcing issues in relation to the teaching and learning of PSHE+C.
  • To develop and maintain a portfolio of evidence recording the development of PSHE+C in our school.

The Teaching and Learning of PSHE and Citizenship

A balanced range of teaching strategies is needed to provide for the effective delivery of PSHE and Citizenship for all children. At Key Stage 1, teaching approaches build on the principles for Early Years’ education (see Curriculum Guidance for the Foundation Stage)

The scheme of work for Key Stages 1 and 2 emphasis active learning and participation, where children are encouraged to assess evidence, negotiate, make decisions, solve problems, work independently and in groups, and learn from each other. While there are opportunities for direct teaching, the units make full use of group work, circle time, role-play, visitors, case studies and simulation to involve children actively. There are strong Literacy links in each unit.

To ensure that children are actively involved in preparing to play an active role as citizens, they progressively have opportunities to:

  • Take responsibility for their own learning, by making informed choices within learning activities, reflecting on and recording what they have learnt and achieved and learning how to set targets to establish next steps.
  • Explore and discuss topical issues, including taking part in group and class discussions relevant to their own lives, their school and wide communities and issues of global concern, and beginning to explore how issues affect others in the world.
  • Participate in groups of different sizes and composition, taking on leadership as well as membership roles, sharing the responsibility for group decisions and contributing to the decision-making processes of the class and school.
  • Explore and discuss the varied attitudes and values underpinning some of the issues they encounter, considering social and moral dilemmas and other people experiences, thinking about and beginning to express view that are not their own, e.g. through role-play.
  • Find information and advice, for example through helplines, and learn to provide information to others.
  • Work with adults other than teacher, using visits and visitors appropriately, meeting and talking to people from, e.g. environmental groups, local, national or international voluntary organisation, and people who work in the school and neighbourhood, such as religious leaders, health professionals, emergency service professionals, local councillors and MPs.
  • Work outside the classroom, becoming actively involved in the decision-making and organisation of the school and, for example helping to look after the school environment, supporting peers or younger children in the playground, taking part in activities with different members of the school and local community.
  • Take time to reflect on all their experiences in both the formal and informal curriculum, identifying what they have learnt and enabling them to transfer that to situations in their own lives, now and in the future.

Presentation/Recording of Work

Early Years: A major emphasis upon Speaking and Listening.

KS1: Major emphasise upon Speaking and Listening. Work recorded in Foundation books.

Year 3/4: Major emphasise upon Speaking and Listening. Work recorded in PSHE+C exercise books. Some work may be recorded in other subjects’ books through cross-curricular links.

Year 5/6: Major emphasise upon Speaking and Listening. Work recorded in PSHE+C books. Some work may be recorded in other subjects’ books through cross-curricular links.

Assessment of PSHE+C

Assessment in PSHE+C is consistent with our whole school assessment policy.

Assessment is diagnostic, formative and summative and:

  1. provides learners with feedback about how well they are doing and how they can improve
  2. provides teachers with information to help them plan appropriate learning activities
  3. informs parents (and others) about the learner’s attainment and progress
  4. provides information and evidence about progression throughout the school

Diagnostic assessment is ongoing as part of normal classroom practice and involves observing and assessing learners working on a task with an explicit learning objective, considering how well each learner performs in relation to the objective. Assessment informs subsequent teaching and planning.

Formative assessment is ongoing and often involves talking to learners, discussing what is expected of them, what they are doing well and what they need to do next. Learners will often be asked to evaluate their own work, formally or informally, as part of this process.

ICT and PSHE and Citizenship

ICT at Key Stages 1 and 2 contributes to PSHE and Citizenship by enabling children to find, collate and combine information, to make critical judgements about the quality, accuracy and relevance to the information they have found and to organise and present their findings to others.

Children also learn that data can be manipulated, for example by sorting it, searching on it or changing aspects of it. They learn how ICT can be used to control devices and automatically sense and log data, and how it is used in the wider community.

ICT helps children to share and communicate information in a variety of ways and to take account of the needs of different audiences as they do so. They learn to communicate through making presentations, publishing and using e-mail. The internet allows them to communicate with people from other places and cultures, and to exchange information and ideas. They explore issues such as internet safety, including the need to be careful about giving out personal details to people they do not know.

Literacy and PSHE and Citizenship

Our PSHE+C SOW, which is based upon the Telling Tales programme, has direct Literacy links. In Literacy during Early Years and Key Stages 1 and 2, children are involved in speaking and listening, group discussion and interaction, role play and reading and writing activities that enable them to develop the knowledge, skills and understanding necessary as they prepare to play an active role as citizens.

Children listen to and read stories that enable them to consider other people’s lives and experiences. They research issues through a range of non-fiction texts and other written sources and use writing skills to express their views and communicate them to a variety of audiences.

Children take turns in discussion, think about the needs of their listeners, and make contributions relevant to the topic. The skills of group participation learnt through Literacy help children to take up and sustain different roles. Drama, story and poetry can provide valuable opportunities for children to explore unfamiliar situations, to clarify varied attitudes and values and to consider others’ points of view. Reading enables children to research and interpret information from a variety of sources and media. Children learn through listening to television and radio, reading newspapers and magazines and exploring ICT-based materials, including the internet – that different sources can present information in different ways.

Numeracy and PSHE and Citizenship

As children develop knowledge, skills and understanding in Numeracy, they learn skills of problem-solving and logical reasoning. They are increasingly able to apply learning in mathematics to their everyday life, to the solution of real problems and to the process of informed decision-making. Children learn that mathematics is a global language because it transcends national and cultural boundaries and can therefore contribute to an understanding of the world as a global community.

As they develop their mathematical skills, children can use them to explore issues relating to their communities, health and the environment. They begin to use and interpret data and recognise that data can be used in meaningful or misleading ways.

Children use Numeracy skills to develop financial capability, learning that money comes from different sources and can be used for different purposes, to look after their money and to realise that future wants and needs may be met through saving.

Science and PSHE+C

There are significant PSHE+C links with Science e.g.:

  • life cycles
  • reproduction
  • diet
  • growth

Cross Curricular Links in PSHE+C

Much learning in PSHE+C is through interactive group work and problem solving and natural links with the broad curriculum are emphasised without contrivance e.g.

  • Design and Technology: e.g. team work and cooperation, healthy diets etc
  • History: e.g. morality and behaviour in other times c/f now etc
  • Geography: e.g. the natural environment and pollution, global warming etc
  • PE: e.g. team work and cooperation, healthy lifstyles etc
  • RE: e.g. the beliefs of different faiths and how these shape behaviours etc
  • MFL: e.g. how people live in other countries etc
  • etc

Promoting children’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development through PSHE and

Citizenship

Through our teaching of PSHE and Citizenship we aim to promote:

Spiritual Development

  • Opportunities for children to explore what is fair and unfair, recognise what is right and wrong, and understand exercise personal, social and moral responsibility.
  • An ability to reflect on spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues, using their imagination to understand other people’s experiences.

Moral Development

  • An understanding of what right, what is wrong and why.
  • An awareness of the consequences of their words and actions for themselves and others.
  • An understanding of how rules help them and to agree and follow rules for their group and classroom. Why are different rules needed in different situations? Taking part in making and changing rules.
  • A recognition of different risks in different situations and then to decide how to behave responsibly.
  • An awareness that pressure to behave in an unacceptable or risky way can come from a variety of sources, including people they know and how to ask for help and use basic techniques for resisting pressure to do wrong.
  • The ability to form good relationships with adults and peers.
  • The ability to work as part of a group or class, taking turns and sharing fairly, understanding that there needs to be agreed values and codes of behaviour for groups of people, including adult and children, to work together harmoniously.
  • An awareness that they belong to various groups and communities, such as family and school and to be able to contribute to the life of the class and school.
  • The ability to make choices that improve their health and well-being.
  • An understanding that family and friends should care for each other.
  • The ability to give their opinions and explain their views on issues that affect themselves and society.

Social Development

Cultural Development

  • An understanding that people have different needs, views, cultures and beliefs, that need to be treated with respect.
  • The ability to identify and respect the differences and similarities between people.
  • An understanding of the lives of people living in other places and people with different values and customs.
  • An appreciation of the range of national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom.

Wider Educational Opportunities in PSHE+C

All of our children have quality learning opportunities both within and outside of the school day. Our programme of extra curricular learning opportunities is a key part of our extended schools programme. All of these opportunities are group based and each “club” is based upon the premise of:

  • positive membership
  • partnership
  • cooperation
  • mutual support and care
  • healthy lifestyles
  • understanding
  • citizenship

Resources

A range of resources for PSHE+C are held centrally and within Year Groups. The key resources are:

  • SEAL
  • Telling Tales

Time allocation for the teaching of PSHE and Citizenship

  • Early Years: much of the work may be an informal part of the child’s early socialisation into the school setting, but formal opportunities are likely to average up to 30 minutes per week.
  • KS1: 30 minutes per week on average.
  • Year 3/4: 30 minutes per week on average.
  • Year 5/6: 30 minutes per week on average.
  • There are also many planned and less formal opportunities to teach and revise key PSHE+C issues through:
  • Assemblies
  • Cross-curricular links
  • School Council
  • Pastoral management
  • Extra-curricular activities
  • etc

Equality/Equal Opportunities

All children are offered a broad, balanced curriculum differentiated to meet their needs as necessary. There is equality of access to the whole curriculum. No child is denied access to any part of the broad curriculum unless specific physical need or religious/cultural considerations make it inappropriate. We are very mindful of the learning needs of all of our children and those with Special Educational Needs are supported well within PSHE and Citizenship via effective planning, teaching and assessment, differentiated activities, as necessary, high, realistic expectations, suitable resources and recording formats. Children who have particular needs in relation to literacy will receive direct adult support in reading and recording.

Children with Special Educational Needs

In most cases an individual child’s needs will be met by appropriate differentiation of tasks and materials. A small number of children may, at times, require access to specialist equipment and approaches or to alternative or adapted activities. Advice/support from external agencies will be sought if appropriate.

In PSHE and Citizenship, as in all subjects, we work towards the three principles of INCLUSION:

  • Setting suitable learning challenges
  • Responding to children’ diverse learning needs
  • Overcoming potential barriers to learning and assessment for individuals and groups of children.

Inclusion: providing effective learning opportunities for all children

When planning and teaching the curriculum we have due regard to the following principles:

  • Setting suitable learning challenges

We give every child the opportunity to experience success in learning and to achieve as a high a standard as possible. The National Curriculum Programmes of Study set out what each pupil should be taught at each Key Stage, but Year Groups/teachers teach the knowledge, skills and understanding in ways that suit individual children’s abilities. This may mean teaching knowledge, skills and understanding from earlier and later Key Stages, so that individual children can make progress and show what they can achieve.

For children whose attainments fall significantly below the expected levels at a particular Key Stage, a much greater degree of differentiation will be necessary. In these circumstances, it may be necessary to use the contents of the Programmes of Study as a resource or to provide a context in planning learning appropriate to the age and requirements of the child.

For children whose attainments significantly exceed the expected level of attainment within one or more subjects within a particular Key Stage, we plan suitably challenging work as well as drawing on materials from later Key Stages or higher levels of study, we plan further differentiation by extending the breadth and depth of study within individual subjects, or by planning work which draws on the content of different subjects.

  • Responding to Children’s Diverse Learning Needs

When planning, we set high expectations and provide opportunities for all children to achieve, including:

  • Boys and girls
  • Children with Special Educational Needs
  • Children with disabilities
  • Children from all social and cultural backgrounds
  • Children from different ethnic groups including travellers, refugees and asylum seekers
  • Children from diverse linguistic background.

We are aware that all children bring to school different experiences, interests and strengths which influence the way in which they learn. We plan our approaches to teaching and learning so that all children can take part in lessons fully and effectively.

We are mindful of the requirements of equal opportunities legislation which covers race, gender and disability.

We respond to children’s diverse learning needs by:

  • Creating effective learning environments
  • Securing their motivation and concentration
  • Providing equality of opportunity through a range of teaching approaches
  • Using appropriate assessments
  • Setting targets for learning

Overcoming Potential Barriers to Learning and Assessment for Individuals and Groups of Children

Some children may have particular learning and assessment needs which go beyond the provisions described above and, if not addressed, could create barriers to learning. These needs are likely to arise as a consequence of a child having a special educational need or disability, or may be linked to a child’s progress in learning English as a second language.

Our planning and assessment for children with special educational needs takes account of the type and extent of the difficulty experienced by the child. In many cases, the action necessary to respond to an individual’s requirements for curriculum access will be met through greater differentiation of tasks and materials. A smaller number of children may need access to specialist equipment and approaches or to alternative or adapted activities.

We work closely, where appropriate, with representatives of other agencies who may be supporting the child (e.g. Behaviour Support Team, Educational Psychologist, Learning Support Advisory Teacher etc.)

Not all children with disabilities will necessarily have special educational needs. Many children with disabilities learn alongside their peers, with little need for additional resources beyond the aids which they use as part of their daily life e.g. wheelchair, hearing aid or equipment to aid vision. We ensure that any child with a disability is enabled to participate as fully and effectively as possible, within the National Curriculum and the Statutory Assessment Arrangements.

Children for whom English is an additional language have diverse needs in terms of support necessary in English language learning. Planning should take account of factors such as:

  • The child’s age
  • Length of time in this country
  • Previous educational experience
  • Skills in other languages

Careful monitoring of the child’s progress in the acquisition of English language skills and of subject knowledge and understanding will be necessary to confirm that no learning difficulties are present.

The ability of children for whom English is an additional language to take part in the National Curriculum may be ahead of their communication skills in English. We take specific action to help children who are learning English as an additional language by:

  • Developing their spoken and written English
  • Ensuring access to the curriculum and assessment

Gifted and Talented Learners

We are committed to providing a rich and challenging curriculum for all our learners; one that promotes the highest standards and encourages each and every individual to achieve their full potential. We have pupils who are gifted and talented and endeavour to ensure we meet their needs.

Gifted and Talented pupils are described in the latest government thinking as being around the top 5 to 10% of the ability range in any cohort.

We keep a register of gifted and talented children and require all staff to be rigorous in their identification of children with gifts and talents.

We strive to offer challenging opportunities both within and beyond the school day to ensure that the needs of gifted and talented children are met appropriately.

Health and Safety

Within any PSHE+C activity, teachers will:

  • recognise hazards, assess consequent risks and take steps to control the risks to themselves and to others
  • use information to assess immediate and cumulative risks

Through school, learners will start to:

  • manage their environment to ensure the health and safety of themselves and others
  • to explain the steps they take to control risks

Appendix Three

Scheme of Work for PSHE and Citizenship

 

1a Being With Other People
1b Knowing Me
1c Living in the Community
2a Protecting the Environment
2b Staying Healthy
2c Living and Growing

 

All Year Groups plan from the Telling Tales SOW. This ensures continuity and progression as well as cross-curricular links, particularly with Literacy.

The Living and Growing unit is an extra one that we have added as it is when Year 5/6 undertake their Sex and Relationships and substance misuse work.