Special Educational Needs and Disability Information Report

(Ratified by Governors on Friday 31st March 2017)

Introduction/Overview

Woodside School promotes learning for life. We are an inclusive, aspirational learning environment where children, families, staff, Governors and the wider community learn together in an atmosphere of co-operation and tolerance. As a community we promote self-discipline, understanding, empathy, co-operation, perseverance and independence. All our children with SEND are fully included in all opportunities, both within and outside of the school day, alongside children who do not have SEND. We encourage a culture of high standards, achievements and expectations. We aim to develop the full potential of every individual. Every child brings valuable experiences and strengths to our school. We build on these by offering a curriculum that is stimulating, accessible, challenging and differentiated to meet the needs of all children. We provide an open, stimulating environment in which every child feels safe, valued and happy. We encourage parents and the wider community to take an active interest in the education of our children and to feel an ownership of their school. Our ethos forms the core of our planning and teaching. Primarily, it is the responsibility of the class teacher to ensure the progress and development of the pupils in their class, supported by our Special Education Needs Team: Charlotte Towne – SENCo (Early Years Phases 2,3 and Years 1 to 6) Vivian Howle – Learning Support Teacher Diane Wetherill – SEND Administrator Sandie Pare – SEND Governor For more information, please contact the SENCo, Charlotte Towne at Woodside School, Gittin Street, Oswestry, Shropshire, SY11 1DT Tel: 01691 652446, E-Mail: sen@woodside.shropshire.sch.uk or go to www.shropshire.gov.uk

How we consult with parents and carers of children with Special Educational Needs

At Woodside Primary School we aim to work with all parents to ensure that the best possible provision is put in place for all pupils. We have an open door policy and parents are welcome to come into school at a mutually convenient time to discuss any concerns they may have. Parents are kept updated of their child’s progress via termly Parent and Teacher Consultations, as well as an annual written report. Parents are consulted at each stage of their child’s education and their views and wishes are extremely important. Any necessary referrals to outside agencies are made in partnership and consultation with the child’s parents. After an assessment has been completed, school will discuss with parents both the findings and the implementation of suggestions made. Parents are invited to come into school termly to discuss their child’s Pupil Centred Plan (PCP), the progress made and the setting of new targets. Parents of children with an Education Health and Care Plan (EHCP) attend two termly meetings as well as an annual review meeting; their views are recorded as part of the meeting.

How we involve our pupils with Special Educational Needs in their learning

All pupils are encouraged to develop a good understanding of their learning. Discussions about individual progress and targets form an important part of daily interventions. The voice of the pupil is gathered through discussion with the child at regular intervals such as when reviewing PCPs, at Annual EHCP Reviews and also when referring a child to an outside agency.

How we support our Looked After Children (LAC)

Our approach to supporting the educational achievement of Looked After Children (LAC) is based on the following principles:

  • Prioritising education
  • Promoting attendance
  • Targeting support
  • Having high expectations
  • Promoting inclusion through challenging and changing attitudes
  • Achieving stability and continuity
  • Early intervention and priority action
  • Listening to children
  • Promoting health and wellbeing
  • Reducing exclusions and promoting stability
  • Working in partnership with carers, social workers and other professionals

As for all our pupils, we are committed to helping every Looked After Child to achieve the highest standards they can, including supporting aspirations to achieve in further and higher education. This can be measured by improvement in their achievements and attendance.

How we support our pupils at times of transition

When pupils move from one class to another, they are given the opportunity to familiarise themselves with their new environment. Staff members share successful interventions and strategies with the teachers of pupils who are transferring to ensure that these continue to be used effectively. At Woodside Primary School, we work closely with our local Secondary Schools. When an Annual EHCP Review is held, the SENCO from the prospective Secondary School is invited to attend. This facilitates additional transition visits and enables parents to express any concerns that they may have. For pupils without an EHCP, the Primary and Secondary School SENCOs work closely together along with the teachers and Head of Year, to ensure that support is put in place before they begin.  In addition, children who are deemed likely to find transition challenging are invited to join small discussion groups run by experienced staff and are often invited to attend extra transition days to the secondary school of their choice.

How we adapt our curriculum and learning environment to include pupils with Special Educational Needs

All the pupils in our school are encouraged to participate fully in all areas of the curriculum and we have high expectations of all pupils. The curriculum is carefully differentiated for all pupils with Special Educational Needs, either by expected outcome, resources provided or the amount of adult support they receive.

Our Provision for Pupils with SEND

1. Speech, Language and Communication Needs

How we identify needs, assess and review progress How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs.
  • The class teacher and the teaching assistant keep careful track of the child and record any observations.
  • A child who continues to be of concern will be observed by the SENCo who will either suggest intervention strategies or refer to the Speech and Language Team (SALT).
  • The pupil will then be carefully monitored and reviewed after a term to ensure that progress is being made.
  • If progress is not being made, other interventions are suggested and , if appropriate,  another referral is made (or an EHCP is requested).
  • Pupils are regularly reviewed through internal tracking data, standardised assessment scores, NFER assessments and national assessments such as Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) Development Matters, EYFSP, EExAT, SATs and phonics screening at Year 1.
  • Pupils with an EHCP have annual reviews of their progress, and sometimes an Interim Annual Review is suggested.
  • Children with speech and language difficulties are encouraged to learn to read by recognising whole words alongside learning to read and spell with phonological awareness.
  • We have a number of members of staff trained in the use of ELKLAN to develop Speech and Language.
  • Staff model correct uses of language by subtle repetition.
  • Children are pre-taught new vocabulary and topic words before they encounter them within the classroom.
  • Children are encouraged to share their ideas, beginning with talking about areas of interest to them though activities such as ‘Show and Tell’. They then contribute to small group discussions and once comfortable, they are encouraged to share their ideas with the whole class.
Specific interventions recommended by the Speech and Language team are used, which may include programs such as

  • Listen with Lucy
  • Differentiated Letters and Sounds groups
  • Black Sheep Activities

2. Autistic Spectrum Disorder

How we identify needs, assess and review progress How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs.
  • The class teacher and the teaching assistant keep careful track of the child and record any observations.
  • If the child continues to be of concern the SENCO will observe and either suggest intervention strategies or refer the pupils to an outside agency.
  • The pupil will be carefully monitored and reviewed after a term to ensure that progress is being made. If progress is not being made then either other interventions are suggested or an Early Help Assessment Form (EHAF) is completed.
  • Parents can also refer their child for assessment of Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) traits by visiting their GP.
  • If appropriate, an Educational Psychologist referral will be requested.
  • Pupils are regularly reviewed through internal tracking data, standardised assessment scores, NFER assessments and national assessments such as EYFS Development Matters, EYFSP, EExAT, SATs and phonics screening at Year 1.
  • Pupils with an EHCP have annual reviews of their progress, and sometimes an Interim Annual Review is suggested.
  • Visual timetables are used within the classroom and children are prepared in advance when there are changes to routines.
  • Pupils are pre-taught new vocabulary before they are exposed to it within the classroom.
  • The anxiety levels of the pupils are monitored and subtle intervention is put in place before pupils become anxious.
  • Pupils are given instructions and requests using straight forward language. Instructions are given in smaller chunks.
Intervention type is specific to each child and may include:

  • Social stories/comic strip conversations.
  • Visual timetables.
  • Quiet / special places offered for reflection.

3. Cognition and Learning: a). Moderate Learning Difficulties

How we identify needs, assess and review progress How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs.
  • The class teacher and the teaching assistant keep careful track of the child and record any observations.
  • A child who continues to be of concern will be observed by the SENCo, who will either suggest intervention strategies or refer the pupil to our Learning Support Teacher or, if appropriate, an external agency.
  • The pupil will be carefully monitored and reviewed after a term, to ensure that progress is being made. If no progress has been made, other interventions are suggested, another referral may be made, or if appropriate, an EHCP is requested.
  • Pupils are regularly reviewed through internal tracking data, standardised assessment scores, NFER assessments and national assessments such as EYFS Development Matters, EYFSP, EExAT, SATs and phonics screening at Year 1.
  • Pupils with an EHCP have annual reviews of their progress, and sometimes an Interim Annual Review is suggested.
  • Pupils are encouraged to work within small groups with the support of an additional adult.
  • Pupils are given work which is carefully differentiated and pupils are put into ability groups when appropriate.
  • Pupils are encouraged to use resources to support their learning such as word banks, number lines and bead strings.
  • Specific interventions are put into place to aid pupils to develop the skills that they require to be able to access the curriculum.
Intervention type is specific to each child and may include:

  • Additional spelling practice.
  • Daily reading and comprehension activities.
  • Rapid reading scheme.
  • Letters and Sounds.
  • Paired reading
  • Precision teaching

b). Specific Learning Difficulties e.g. Dyslexia, Dyscalculia and Dyspraxia

How we identify needs, assess and review progress How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs.
  • The class teachers and teaching assistants track each child’s progress and record any observations.
  • If the child’s progress and attainment continues to be of concern, the LST will assess and either implement or suggest intervention strategies or recommend a referral to an external agency.
  • For some children an assessment with an Educational Psychologist is requested.
  • The child will then be carefully monitored and reviewed after a term to check that progress is being made.
  • Pupils are regularly reviewed through internal tracking data, standardised assessment scores and national assessments such as EYFS Development Matters, EYFPS, SATs and phonics screening at Year 1.
  • Pupils with an EHCP have annual reviews of their progress, and sometimes an Interim Annual Review is suggested.
  • Pupils work with a teaching assistant within a small group when appropriate. For some activities pupils are ability grouped.
  • Pupils receive specific interventions with LST and/or teaching assistants Pupils access resources to support their learning such as word banks, dictionaries, number lines, practical apparatus etc.
  • Overlearning of concepts.
  • Secure with concepts.
Intervention type is specific to each child and may include:

  • Dyslexia Portfolio (assessment)
  • Dyscalculia Screener (assessment)
  • Coloured overlays
  • Wordshark
  • Alpha Omega
  • Letters and Sounds
  • Cool Kids

4. Social, Mental and Emotional Health

How we identify needs, assess and review progress How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs.
  • The class teachers and teaching assistants track each child’s progress and record any observations.
  • If the child continues to be of concern the SENCo will observe and suggest intervention strategies. If concerns still exist, the Early Help process will be started, if appropriate.
  • Parents can also raise concerns and refer their child for assessments by visiting their GP.
  • Pupils are regularly reviewed through internal tracking data, standardised assessment scores, NFER assessments and national assessments such as EYFS Development Matters, EYFSP, SATs and phonics screening at Year 1.
  • Pupils with an EHCP have annual reviews of their progress, and sometimes an Interim Annual Review is suggested.
    • Pupils are encouraged to work with others within a small group with the support of an adult.

Pupils are encouraged to share their ideas with others and adult model how to take turns, share and negotiate with their peers.

Intervention type is specific to each child and may include:

  • Adult Learning Mentors, who provide 1:1 support on a regular basis, as required.
  • Friendship Stops on the playground
  • “No Worries” group
  • Anger Management group
  • Transition support groups

5. Sensory and/or Physical a). Hearing Impairment

How we identify needs, assess and review progress How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs.
  • The class teachers and teaching assistants track each child’s progress and record any observations.
  • If the child continues to be of concern, the SENCo will observe and suggest intervention strategies and parents will be asked to request an assessment by visiting their GP.
  • Pupils are regularly reviewed and assessed by the Sensory Inclusion Team. They also monitor their hearing aids and ensure that they are working adequately and replace any parts that are no longer working.
  • Pupils are regularly reviewed through internal tracking data, standardised assessment scores, NFER assessments and national assessments such as EYFS Development Matters, EYFSP, EExAT, SATs and phonics screening at Year 1.
  • Pupils with an EHCP have annual reviews of their progress, and sometimes an Interim Annual Review is suggested.
  • Pupils usually work within a small group with the subtle support of an adult.
  • The adult will repeat ideas and comments of other children when the class are discussing ideas, in a clear and audible voice.
  • Pupils are encouraged to wear hearing aids if appropriate and these are monitored daily in a subtle and unobtrusive way.
  • Pupils are encouraged to ask for ideas to be repeated or to be explained again if they have not heard or understood them.
Intervention type is specific to each child and include:

  • Ensuring pupils sit near the front of the classroom.
  • Following advice from sensory inclusion.
  • Pupils are encouraged to wear hearing aids if appropriate and an amplification loop box can be worn by the adults if this is suggested by the Sensory Inclusion Team.

b). Visual Impairment

How we identify needs, assess and review progress How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs.
  • Pupils are monitored carefully and if there are concerns, parents are requested to take their child for an appointment with the optician.
  • For pupils with significant impairments a referral is made to the Sensory Inclusion team. This is usually requested by the child’s optician or by an optometrist.
  • Pupils are regularly reviewed and assessed by the Sensory Inclusion team. Additional strategies and interventions are suggested.
  • Pupils are regularly reviewed through internal tracking data, standardised assessment scores and national assessments such as EYFS Development Matters, EYFSP, EExAT, SATs and phonics screening at Year 1. Pupils with an EHCP have annual reviews of their progress, and sometimes an Interim Annual Review is suggested.
  • Pupils are encouraged to sit near the front of the class so they can clearly see any visual information that is displayed.
  • Information that is displayed on the whiteboard is presented using a clear and large font, with a colour background if necessary. If this is not possible then the pupils are given a copy of what is to be displayed.
  • If pupils have a significant visual impairment, the teacher will ensure that furniture and resources remain in expected locations so they are easy to find.
Intervention type is specific to each child and may include:

  • Providing pupils with documents which use a larger font.
  • Using different coloured paper to print worksheets and tasks on to.
  • Using coloured overlays/reading rulers
  • Modification of reading books

c). Physical Difficulties

How we identify needs, assess and review progress How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs.
  • The class teachers and teaching assistants track each child’s progress and record any observations.
  • If the child continues to be of concern the SENCo will observe and either suggest intervention strategies or refer to an appropriate external agency.
  • A referral to the occupational therapy team and/or the physiotherapy team will be undertaken if appropriate and additional strategies will be implemented.
  • Parents can also request an assessment with the occupational therapy team and/or the physiotherapy by visiting their GP.
  • If appropriate a request for an EHCP is made and additional interventions and strategies are put into place to support the pupil.
  • Pupils are regularly reviewed through internal tracking data, standardised assessment scores and national assessments such as EYFS Development Matters, EYFPS, SATs and phonics screening at Year 1. Pupils with an EHCP have annual reviews of their progress, and sometimes an Interim Annual Review is suggested.
  • Pupils are encouraged to sit with the rest of class or small group to listen to the ideas of others. If necessary, an adult will sit near pupils to keep then on task.
  • Pupils are provided with resources such as pencil grips, lap tops etc. so they are able to write about their own ideas.
  • When the pupils are completing physical activities such as P.E. or outdoor learning, they are encouraged to participate in the same way as their peers. If this is not possible they are given different resources or the subtle support of an adult so they are able to participate.
  • When pupils are using tools and resources, the appropriate use of these are modelled by an adult and specialist tools are used if appropriate.
Intervention type is specific to each child and may include:

  • Cool Kids
  • Teodorescu
  • Pre-writing skills such as using tweezers, using mazes etc.
  • Pencil grips / tri-grip pencils
  • Lap tops
  • Wobble cushions
  • Fidget toys
  • Interventions as suggested by the occupational therapy team.
  • Writing slope

How do we involve parents and carers?

At Woodside Primary School parents are involved at each stage of their child’s education. We have an open door policy and parents are encouraged to discuss concerns with staff as they arise at a mutually convenient time. All parents are invited into school for termly meeting with the class teacher to review and update their child’s PCP. Their views are important to the school and these are recorded within the reviews. The level that the pupil is working at is reported to the parents and progress is highlighted. Advice about how a parent/carer can support their child’s learning is provided at these meetings.A report is provided for parents, which they are welcome to discuss at a mutually agreed time.

How we involve our pupils with Special Educational Needs in the assessment and review process

Pupils are expected to be active participants in their assessment and learning. They are encouraged to think about the progress that they have made, and what they feel their next steps may be on a daily basis as they complete activities. Pupils are encouraged to share their ideas about the way that they learn and areas that they feel they need additional support with.

How we assess and evaluate the effectiveness of our SEN provision and how we involve parents, carers and pupils in this process

Each term teachers and teaching assistants evaluate the Provision Map and suggest ways that the provision can be improved. This is then used to inform and update the next provision map. The effectiveness of the interventions and the strategies that have been put into place are evaluated through PCP reviews, which are discussed at the termly PCP meeting with parents, and a variety of assessments that take place through the year. We are also monitored by the Local Authority through Monitoring Visits to ensure that the interventions that are in place are having a high impact and also to ensure that all pupils are making good progress. The school is monitored by Ofsted and the pupils with SEND are reviewed and monitored by the Local Authority.

How we ensure access to our facilities for all of our pupils

We adhere to the Disability Discrimination Act. Pupils with special educational needs have access to a range of extra-curricular physical activities which are available either side of the school day. Pupils also have access to individual music tuition for a range of instruments such as piano, clarinet etc.

What training have our teachers and other staff had to enable them to support pupils with Special Educational Needs effectively?

All teaching staff are responsible for pupils with Special Educational Needs. They liaise with teaching assistants on a regular basis to ensure that they have a good understanding of the interventions used to support pupils. This also contributes to the teaching assistant’s professional development as they increase their understanding of different support strategies. Staff  in our school participate in professional development training to enable them to support their pupils effectively.  As part of an ongoing programme, our staff receive training in aspects of Special Educational Needs and disabilities.  We have expertise in several areas of need and provide individual and group teaching to meet needs in order to facilitate learning and progress. We have staff who are experienced in working with children with ASD, Asperger’s Syndrome, Down’s Syndrome, visual impairment, hearing impairment and cerebral palsy. Staff have received training in many aspects of SEND including: Makaton, ELKLAN, visual impairment, autism (including anxiety, anger and sensory issues), dyslexia, dyscalculia, paired reading, precision teaching, Cool Kids, touch typing, Wordshark, MindEd, Mental Health First aid, mindfulness and disability awareness. Should specialist advice need to be secured, we have links to various agencies who can provide this.

How we obtain the services, provision and equipment required by our pupils with Special Educational Needs

We have close links with outside agencies, including SPECTRA Inclusion Services, Independent Educational Psychologists, the Occupational Therapy Team, the Sensory Inclusion, the Speech and Language Team and Disabled Children’s Team who provide advice, assessments and specialist equipment. Referrals to these agencies are made in partnership with parents, who receive copies of reports and also opportunity to speak to the relevant specialists regarding their children. We access Health and Social Care bodies and local authority support service through Early Help and Strengthening Families. This process allows us to access Shropshire Recovery Partnership, EnHance, Lifelines, CAMHS, Children’s centres, Targeted Youth and PACT. We can also request advice and support from voluntary organisations such as NSPCC, Autism West Midlands, All-in Project and Young Carers support.

How we support the emotional and social development of our pupils with Special Educational Needs

At Woodside Primary School we actively seek to support and nurture the emotional and social well-being of all pupils. We monitor all pupils carefully and encourage pupils to talk to the adults in our school if they are anxious or worried about anything. If we are aware that there are pupils who are emotionally or socially at risk, we work with them using specific interventions, such as the use of Learning Mentors, “ No Worries” groups and Transition groups. If we as a school are unable to support the pupils in our care, then we will complete the Early Help process, if this is appropriate.

If you have any questions or concerns about our provision for pupils with Special Educational Needs

We have an open door policy at our school and parents are encouraged to discuss concerns or questions that they may have as they arise with either the class teacher or SENCO. If parents feel that the school has not supported their child adequately, they have the right to bring this to the attention of the Head Teacher or the Chair of Governors. The school will then try to resolve this internally, for example discussing other ways that the child could be supported. For more information, please contact the SENCo, Charlotte Towne, at Woodside School, Gittin Street, Oswestry, Shropshire, SY11 1DT Tel: 01691 652446 E-Mail: sen@woodside.shropshire.sch.uk Useful links: Shropshire Council Local Offer – http://new.shropshire.gov.uk/the-send-local-offer/ IASS – http://www.cabshropshire.org.uk/shropshire-iass/ AWM – http://www.autismwestmidlands.org.uk/ Early Help – http://new.shropshire.gov.uk/early-help

Glossary of useful terms

AlphaOmega – A phonological programme used with dyslexic children
ASD – Autistic Spectrum Disorder
Cool Kids – A structured program, recommended by Occupational Therapy, which supports gross motor skill development and sensory processing needs.
Dyscalculia – A specific learning disorder that is characterised by a lack of number sense, difficulties in learning basic arithmetic facts and performing accurate and fluent calculations.
Dyslexia – A general term for disorders that involve difficulty in learning to read or interpret words, letters, and other symbols, irrespective of overall intelligence.
Early Help – This is the pathway to enable agencies, such as CAMHS, EnHance or Children’s Centres, to work with children and their families.
EExAT – Electronic tracking system used from birth to 5 years old
EHCP – Education Health and Care Plan
ELKLAN – Speech and Language Training
EYFSP – Early Years Foundation Stage Profile
LAC – Looked After Children
Letters and Sounds – Letters and Sounds is a phonics resource published by the Department for Education and Skills in 2007. It aims to build children’s speaking and listening skills in their own right as well as to prepare children for learning to read by developing their phonic knowledge and skills
LST – Learning Support TeacherNFER – NFER tests provide standardised and age-related scores which have been nationally benchmarked
PCP – Person Centred Planning
Phonics Screening – The phonics screening check is a short, simple assessment to make sure that all pupils have learned phonic decoding to an appropriate standard by the age of 6
Provision Map – Provision Mapping is a succinct and inclusive way of showing the range of provision
available to pupils throughout the school
SATs – Standard Assessment Tests ( National tests undertaken in Yrs 2 & 6)
SENCO – Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator
SEND – Special Educational Needs and Disabilities
Teodorescu – The Teodorescu Percepuo-Motor Programme is a resource book that develops perceptual and fine motor control with the aim of developing fluency and accuracy
Wordshark – Wordshark is a computer program that combines the fun and excitement of bright, multi-sensory games with the serious task of learning to read and spell
YARC – York Assessment of Reading Comprehension

(Updated 21 Mar 2016 – M. Owen)